SharpGIS

#GIS from a .NET developer's perspective

Impressions from Microsoft PDC

I attended the Microsoft PDC in Los Angeles Convention Center this week, and here's a recap of various statements, quotes and sessions that I found interesting.

 

WCF Preconference notes

It looks like a class, it feels like a class, it smells like a class, it works like a class – but it’s a service!

This was a full day seminar on Windows Communication Foundation. It was very cool to see how ordinary looking classes could be turned into WCF services that can be exposed through a multitude of protocols using just two class/method attributes. One of the interesting statements were how .NET had replaced COM 7 years after its introduction, and now 8 years later, WCF is replacing .NET (well at least the part that replaced COM). Or to put it in the presenters word: ".NET as you know it is dead!"

WCF is host agnostic. No difference between hosting on IIS, in-proc, self-hosting, Windows Activation Service etc.

Possible transport protocols: HTTP, HTTPS, TCP, P2P, IPC, MSMQ.
Possible message formats: Plain text, Binary, MTOM.
Security options: None, Transport security, Message security, Authentication and authorizing callers.

WCF is the first platform that provides Interoperability, Productivity/Quality AND Extensibility all at once.

Favorite sessions

I must admit that many of the sessions were a little dissappointing. They were often marked as advanced or expert level, but rarely lived up to that. There were also way too many Twitter demos. But having said that, here are the ones I attended that didn't dissappoint. You can watch them all online by clicking the links next to them or see the whole list of sessions here.

  • TL16: "The Future of C#" by Anders Hejlsberg. My Danish hero and the brain behind C# talks about where C# is headed with upcoming v4 and 5 of C#. View
  • TL49: "Microsoft .NET Framework: Overview and Applications for Babies" by Scott Hanselman. Using a a wide varity of .NET core technologies, Scott takes his BabySmash application and ports it to WPF, Silverlight, Mobile and Surface, in his usual entertaining way. Great demonstration of the power of .NET. View
  • PC06: "Deep Dive: Building an Optimized, Graphics-Intensive Application in Microsoft Silverlight" by Seema Ramchandani. Seema goes through all the gory internal details of how Silverlight works and uses this knowledge to present a great set of tips and tricks to making the performance of your Silverlight applications scream. A must-see if you are doing serious work with Silverlight. View
  • TL26: "Parallel Programming for Managed Developers with the Next Version of Microsoft Visual Studio" by Daniel Moth. Processors are not really getting much faster anymore, but instead we get more and more cores to work with, but this also requires us to start changing the way we make software. The Parallel Framework that comes in .NET 4 makes this task really easy. All I can say is that this framework rocks! View
  • BB24: "SQL Server 2008: Deep Dive into Spatial Data" by Isaac Kunen. Isaac's deep dive on the spatial support in SQL Server (thanks for the plug Isaac :-). View
  • PC29: "Microsoft Silverlight 2: Control Model" by Karen Corby. Good information on how to build reusable, skinnable controls for Silverlight. View
  • PC32: "ASP.NET AJAX Futures" by Bertrand Le Roy. Upcoming features for ASP.NET AJAX. View
  • TL46: "Microsoft Visual C# IDE: Tips and Tricks" by Dustin Campbell. LOTS of great shortcuts and features in Visual Studio that you never knew was there and you wonder how you could ever live without. MUST SEE if you want to be more efficient when coding C# in Visual Studio. View
There were a lot of sessions I didn't make it to, but hopefully I'll get some time to view them online over the next coming weeks. If I see anything more that I like, I'll update this list. If you have watched any good sessions as well, please feel free to mention it in the comments.

 

My favorite comment was Juval Lowy's reaction when he the first time heard that Microsoft was working on the successor to VB6:

Giving VB developers access to a multithreaded environment (VB.NET) is like giving razorblades to babies.

It’s not that C++ developers are better off with C#, but they are more used to seeing blood.

 

Microsoft is already planning a new PDC next year November 17-20, 2009 (unfortunately same place).

Comments (3) -

  • Vish

    11/2/2008 3:44:30 PM |

    Loved that quote by Juval Lowy...So true. It is not going to be easy for .NET developers. Hopefully Parallel extensions in .NET 4.0 is smart enough to prevent us from doing dumb things when starting to tackle paralle programming.

    Vish

  • Morten

    11/2/2008 6:08:02 PM |

    Vish: I can only recommend that you watch the parallel programming session. The framework is really simple to work with. Basically instead of you having to manage threads (and the overhead of creating them), the task based framework never creates more threads than you have CPU cores, and will automatically take care of queuing them up and executing them (this works globally across all applications). So you can basically start 1000 tasks at the same time, but only 4 tasks would run simultaneously on a quad core CPU.

  • Rem

    11/4/2008 3:26:34 PM |

    Nice blog...

Comments are closed